Smart City - a city adapted to the expectations of the residents

According to the estimates of analysts, the next decades will lead to unprecedented growth of population living in urban areas. The trend of world urbanization gains more and more momentum – in the next decade, an urban centre the size of Wrocław will be built every month, while agglomerations will absorb 700 million new residents. The main factors driving the trend of migration to the cities, such as:

  • economic grounds, i.e. waiting for the availability of attractive jobs by both skilled and unskilled workers;
  • social grounds, i.e. expecting better access to public services, better housing conditions, access to healthcare facilities, education and the media,

exist regardless of historical, geographical and cultural differences.

At the same time, the growth of human capital in cities as such is not a guarantee for meeting the expectations of the growing number of residents. Together with the growth of the city, problems related to pollution, logistics, energy management, discrepancies concerning the quality of life of inhabitants and thus crime are also growing. Maintaining a positive economic balance (700 largest cities, inhabited by approx. 20% of the world population, generate more than half of GDP) poses greater challenges for services and municipal authorities in the area of efficient management, not only in the light of crisis, but also concerning the cities’ daily functioning.

Dalej

In order to meet these challenges and wanting to systematize the knowledge of the effective management of the city, institutions and research centres in the world are trying to formulate a definition of a "smart city", identifying crucial areas whose proper functioning affects the overall prosperity of the city and its residents. One of these working definitions (the term “working” is used due to the fact that the concept is relatively new) is the one according to which smart city is a city that strives to solve public problems through the use of ICT-based solutions (information and communication technologies) as a result of partnership cooperation of stakeholders, service providers, at the level of municipal authorities. According to this definition, some analysts distinguish six basic components that make up the smart city:

  1. smart management (understood as transparent exchange of information between residents, city, central units and units of municipal services, police, fire-fighting and ambulance services);
  2. smart economics (market-drivers such as e-business and e-commerce) that enables the efficient flow of goods, services and knowledge at the level of the city and between cities;
  3. smart mobility (understood as safe, effective and efficiently linked management systems related to transportation, logistics, public transport, cycling traffic, parking);
  4. smart management of environment resources (smart meters, energy storage aids, devices assisting in reducing energy consumption, rational management of electrical energy, smart lighting systems, implementation of renewable energy sources, waste management);
  5. smart education/information for residents (access to training and education via modern information and communication technologies, supporting resources, creativity and human potential, enabling active participation of residents in community life in urban areas);
  6. smart lifestyle (allowing for improving the quality of life based on ICT – a wider, more diverse range of cultural offer and services, better knowledge of healthcare facilities and residential offer).

Smart city is therefore a very broad concept, covering infrastructural, organizational and social issues.

This whole structure forms a body whose smooth functioning is not possible without the "nervous system", which consists of intelligent devices, networks, processes and services that deliver, collect and consolidate the acquired data into a form which allows their use in decision-making and management.

Achieving the overarching goal, i.e. to balance the economic success of the city and residents’ satisfaction is not possible without a coherent vision of the sustainable development of the city for many years, which thus assumes that at the start, all elements, both infrastructural and organizational, will be built with the awareness of the possibilities of their mutual cooperation – the key to the success of a smart city is in fact the integration and interoperability of systems, services and processes.

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Our reality

Most activities of local governments in Poland are still focused on the most essential investments in "hard" infrastructure (such as road maintenance). Unfortunately, in such a way it is difficult for us to catch up with efficient and smart urban centres in Scandinavia, Austria, Italy, the Netherlands, and Great Britain. In the ranking of number of smart cities, we do not score too high. Interestingly, it does not result solely from wealth or size of population in cities, as similar scores (in terms of number of smart cities) are obtained, for instance, by German citiesInvestments undertaken either by central units (modernization of lighting system – SOWA programme) or locally, such as the introduction of video surveillance systems, public Wi-Fi zones, often do not contain the necessary features of modularity and openness to co-operate with other systems of the city. Ad hoc solutions - implementation of different technologies not interacting with each other - result in problems related to maintenance and servicing of devices operating within the systems, and, consequently, in additional costs for the municipal budget.

Meanwhile, skilfully introduced concept of a smart city carries a measurable potential not only in the form of budget relief, but mainly via the improvement of the living conditions of residents, increased sense of security and active participation in the urban life, for example:

  • Intelligent Transportation System in Bucharest, according to the research of the Technical University of Bucharest for the period between March 2008 and March 2009, with an increase in road traffic of 5% in that period, resulted in:
    • shortening the travel time of private road users by 20%,
    • shortening the travel time of privileged public transport by 59%,
    • reducing the total CO2 emission by 10%.

Data from Rome, Turin and Oslo show the shortening of travel time of private road users by 15% and shortening the travel time of public transport by 28%.

  • Replacing traditional mercury or sodium lighting with LED-technology, you can obtain 60-70% savings in annual electricity consumption for urban lighting (cities of Erkrath or Stutensee in Germany). Additional savings can be achieved by introducing signalling and information boards based on high-quality light-emitting diodes.
  • Introducing intelligent transport systems which consist of guidance systems for parking space, as well as urban traffic management systems that are also correlated with modern and safe road lighting, in order to reduce fatalities in road traffic, plus reduce travel time and hence harmful exhaust emission.
  • Facilitating access to local public services and municipal services to increase crime detection.

All this affects the assessment of the administration and support of the residents. At the same time, energy savings and improvement in the management of environmental resources influences the assessment of external institutions and tourist attractiveness of the city.

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A broader view

In order to meet the challenges faced by the administration of a modern city, Cisco and its partners offer a complete system architecture Cisco Smart+Connected Community, covering different components of a smart city.

The proposed solution is a modular platform for delivering services and applications that use cloud computing technology, which can be shaped depending on the expected level of control and security of processed data, towards the direction of a private solution, fully embedded in the ICT structure of the city, or a public one, using external solutions.

Components that are part of the architecture include such areas of operation of the city as:

  • transport management :
    • the central gathering of information on traffic flows, control of traffic lights and flows depend on the current road situation, real-time traffic incidents, improving the capacity of road transport system of the city,
    • the management of public transport, enabling monitoring of rolling stock, effective passenger information, building dynamic schedules, allowing more comfortable use of public transport, better resource planning and savings linked to more efficient use of rolling stock,
    • parking management system with guidance for road users, enabling efficient guidance for vacant parking space, detection of exceeding the parking time, booking parking places.
  • utilities management:
    • telemetry mechanisms for water and sewers, allowing prediction of losses and failures, remote meter reading, improving the efficiency of municipal companies and reducing costs associated with losses,
    • telemetry mechanisms for waste management, enabling remote monitoring for the capacity of containers, detecting fires and other events, increasing safety and allowing optimal management of waste disposal.
  • energy consumption management – mechanisms to monitor and control energy consumption in public buildings (offices, schools), enabling substantial savings.
  • public safety::
    • video monitoring supported by automatic video analytics, which provides an automated detection of adverse effects (e.g. offenses, vandalism), improving security and enabling rapid response of law enforcement services,
    • monitoring of mass events (e.g. sport events) to enable smooth operation of rapid response services,
    • supporting crisis management, ensuring effective communication mechanisms (permanent and temporary), both in daily work and organization of crisis management teams.
  • intelligent lighting systems – enabling smooth control of lighting leading to energy savings, improvement of comfort and safety of the residents,
  • mechanisms for data collection and analysis – enabling the correlation of obtained information and building a knowledge base about the current state of urban infrastructure, as well as enabling to share acquired data with external institutions and organizations, supporting the cooperation with them and ensuring transparency in decision-making processes.

All components share a common communication platform, enabling the efficient collection and exchange of information between them and management via a central console (Dashboard).

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Investment financing

Supporting the realization of smart cities projects is one of the priorities of the starting EU financial perspective. Funding mechanisms for such projects are available, among others, within the adopted Digital Poland Operational Programme and via components of Regional Operational Programmes (ROPs).

In order to obtain the funding, it is required to use complementary solutions based on selected actions within the framework of ROPs and to contribute with own funds, which are, on the one hand, a participation in ROPs, and, on the other hand - investments complementary to ROPs’ tasks and targeted towards areas not covered by them.

Cisco and its partners offer a wide range of financial mechanisms to enable selection of the optimal method of financing for the implementation of our solutions. Depending on the needs, we offer deferred payment mechanisms, credits, and more.

Major suppliers of solutions

  • Cisco secure communication and data processing
  • IBM data aggregation and processing systems
  • Philips efficient lighting systems
  • Schneider Electric intelligent energy management
  • Swarcointelligent transport systems

Case study

Hamburg – a city which is a huge industrial centre, having one of the largest seaports in Europe, must be well communicated. Therefore, the government of Hamburg is implementing a system of traffic management. By analyzing data on the movement of vehicles and vessels, it enables controlling traffic and using parking areas or public transport more comfortably. These solutions result in residents smoothly navigating within the city. The system is complemented with intelligent street lighting, allowing the management of particular lamps and influencing the reduction of energy consumption by up to 70%.

Amsterdam – Amsterdam was the first city in Europe to have WiFi. It is thus not surprising that the city is a pioneer when it comes to implementing “smart city” solutions and “the Internet of things”. Amsterdam has smart parking, street and warning lighting systems, as well as smart electricity grids. By analyzing information on the road traffic, the system dynamically responds to the current situation in the city. These solutions significantly increase the quality of life of residents and their level of safety and contribute to cost reduction.

Barcelona – Barcelona will soon be able to boast about one of the most modern urban transport systems in Europe. The city authorities have introduced a test of smart bus stops equipped with touch screens, WiFi and LCD screens, which display information for residents and tourists. Information collected by the system will allow for reducing the waiting time and analysing the congestion in the transportation system. First smart busses, equipped with wireless network, have also appeared in the capital of Catalonia. Barcelona residents can also benefit from the smart parking and road lighting system. All these solutions reinforce Barcelona’s position on the tourist market and improve the quality of life of residents.


Educational revolution

Ensuring the optimal development and education level for young people has always been one of the primary goals of human actions. Confronting many challenges, both social and economic, we aim to provide new generations with the best possible access to knowledge, while attempting to optimize the educational process in order to make it as efficient as possible.

Therefore, let’s consider what sort of needs are being faced by today's educational environment and what tools can help to adapt it to the requirements of tomorrow.

  • First of all – the student.

    The generation that enters and will enter schools and universities today and tomorrow is significantly different from the students several years ago. They are much more active, open-minded and familiar with the new technologies. The world is a global village for them, and ubiquitous access to information is something natural. They expect other tools and the educational process constructed in a different manner than for their parents – based, to a larger extent, on the interaction, more personalized and engaging, with an increase in the attractiveness of activities. As shown in the annual „Horizon Report”, which sets trends for the education before lower secondary school, the adoption of new technologies, together with the change of teacher’s role, will be crucial for meeting these expectations.

  • Second of all – the parents.

    Today, they expect a much better control over the educational process and progress of their children. Parent-teacher meetings, providing basic information on a quarterly basis, are not a sufficient source of information. Parents increasingly use the Internet, social media and want to get involved in creating an educational environment. They expect to have access to information on a regular basis and they want a two-way communication, which is not provided by traditional media. Their criteria for evaluation of school and educational process are also changing - more emphasis is put on aspects related to practical applicability of gained knowledge and children’s chances of success, both during later stages of the educational process and later on - after entering the labour market. What is also significant is facilitating contact with school for parents with hearing or movement impairments.

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  • Third of all – the teacher.

    The teachers’ role is increasingly moving away from being the central point of the classroom and the main source of information towards being the moderator and adviser. Increasingly, they see the need for using new technologies in teaching and the necessity to improve communication, both with the student and parent. The study of the education market led by Cisco, along with the Clarus organization, also indicates that teachers aim, on the one hand, to increase the attractiveness of courses, and, on the other hand - to personalize the process and better integrate the students who are excluded and have problems catching up with the group.

  • Fourth of all – the administration.

    On the one hand, today the costs associated with the maintenance of educational units often constitute nearly half of local government budgets, on the other - the dispersion of units and their financing significantly impede effective control and optimization of expenses, which poses a significant challenge for local governments. There are often clear discrepancies in the availability of high-quality resources between educational institutions, even within individual cities - often caused by a lack of standards and ad hoc implementations. From the perspective of local governments, harmonizing these mechanisms is a key to improving the efficiency of education management.

Today's communities also face demographic problems - the dynamics of the local labour market and the need to stimulate the profiling of teaching in relation to its projected needs or smart regional specializations becomes the next priority, while homogeneous tools supporting the educational process can be a mechanism for reducing disparities between schools in the quality of the educational process and its results.

The revolution related to the educational process must therefore focus on increasing the attractiveness and interactivity of classes, a multidimensional improvement of communication and standardizing the processes and solutions used in various educational institutions.

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In search ofthe Holy Grail

All the challenges and expectations that we formulate concerning the education of tomorrow seem to be overwhelming. Even though their implementation by silo approach allows to achieve ad hoc success, their effect is quickly offset by difficulties of subsequent integration of systems and dispersed management solutions. It is necessary to have a broader look at this environment and to unify chosen solutions, ensuring their proper cooperation, openness and upgradeability.

The implementation of ICT solutions tailored for modern education will bring a number of tangible benefits:

  • in the classroom:
    • access to remote resources, courses, laboratories and video communication to complement and enrich the educational process, raising the level of education;
    • social networking, resource sharing – this creates a new learning environment beyond the school walls;
    • digital resources allow project-based education, teaching practical application of acquired knowledge, developing creativity, teamwork skills and awareness of taken decisions;
    • teacher is granted access to teaching tools that were beyond reach;
    • the educational process in the classroom involves all students, not just a small group “at the blackboard” - the teacher obtains better mechanisms to personalize the message and control the progress of students.
  • during the break:
    • students and teachers gain access to communication tools, Internet resources - in a safe and effective manner.
  • in the communication:
    • innovative communication technologies enable effective school-student-parent communication, including all interested parties in the school life, shaping and control over the educational process
    • communication platforms allow cooperation between different levels of education (primary, lower secondary, upper secondary, higher)
    • mechanisms facilitating the use of educational services and contact for people with hearing and movement impairments.
  • in financing:
    • unified, standardized mechanisms and management support systems for educational institutions enable the optimization of spending, consolidation of accounting services, centralization of purchases - leading to measurable savings;
    • centralized management of the ICT infrastructure in schools improves the efficiency of its maintenance and allows for high availability and security level, while reducing workload of the school administration related to tasks that are not in their domain of competence.
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A broader view

Looking at Polish school today from the perspective of technology solutions that support the educational process, communication and management of institutions, we usually see an autonomous institution, investing on an ad hoc basis in solutions to support management, communication or educational process. This leads to sub-optimal use of resources, both investment-wise (associated with the purchase of systems) and operational (related to their maintenance).

To change this state of affairs, it is necessary to adopt a more systematic approach to building solutions that support education. The system architecture proposed by us allows for centralizing functions that are being repeated in particular institutions and addresses the challenges outlined earlier. An open, modular design, based on solutions provided by global and national technology leaders allows gradual extension of functionality and the expansion of the system reach.

Cisco and its partners propose a solution that is a modern platform for delivering services and educational applications that use the technology of cloud computing. Depending on the desired level of control and security of the processed data, it can be shaped towards the direction of a private solution, fully embedded in the ICT structure of the city, or a public one, using external solutions.

The overriding goal of building the system is the implementation of services to address various groups of challenges identified earlier, in particular:

  • providing digital educational resources:
    • interactive lessons - resources to support the curriculum using multimedia mechanisms;
    • virtual laboratories - interactive, individual tasks supporting the practical acquisition of knowledge, available in a virtual environment;
    • remote lectures and labs - classes conducted remotely, for example by university professors, with the possibility of two-way interaction;
    • remote teaching - allowing participation in activities of students benefitting from individualised learning pathways or excluded students via videoconferences, with the possibility of working together on documents and applications;
    • tools to support interaction - mechanisms for increasing the involvement of the whole class, such as interactive whiteboards connected with personal mobile devices (e.g. tablets).
  • improving communication within and outside of institutions:
    • multi-channel communication - the use of remote channels (video, chat, www) to improve communication with parents, work within the framework of working groups or special interest groups that go beyond a single institution;
    • social networking - a dedicated web portal that enables electronic school-student-parent communication, group work, building thematic communities or personal workspaces;
    • integrated interpreting services for sign language, allowing contact for persons with impairments of hearing.
  • tools for managing educational institutions:
    • financial and accounting system;
    • human resources system;
    • electronic recruitment system;
    • organization management;
    • library management;
    • electronic journal.
  • safe IT infrastructure:
    • secure Internet access - controlled access to the Internet with filtering resources, elimination of harmful content, registration and monitoring of connected devices;
    • infrastructure on demand – resources of data processing available on demand for institutions, enabling the creation of additional services, network services, moving locally held sites, etc.;
    • remote technical support - centralized, interactive technical support limiting the need to maintain local ICT support;
    • archiving data - disk space for local and remote ICT systems of educational institutions;
    • mobile devices management - control and monitoring of mobile devices (e.g. tablets) used by an institution, remote management of application portfolio, protection against theft.
 

interactive, personalized educational process

(students, teachers)

school-parents communication

(teachers, administration, parents)

optimization of costs

(administration, local government)

providing digital educational resources

tools for communication within, between and outside of institutions

tools for educational institutions’ management

safe IT infrastructure

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Investment financing

Support for education is one of the priorities of the Polish government in the 2014 – 2020 perspective. Among the adopted operational programmes under the EU funds, financing mechanisms for such projects are available under the “Digital Poland” Operational Programme, “Smart Development”, “Knowledge Education Development" and part of the Regional Operational Programmes - ROPs (the regions of Lower Silesia, Lublin, Lubusz, Łódź, Mazovia, Opole, Podkarpackie, Podlaskie, Pomerania, Świętokrzyskie, Warmia-Masuria, Greater Poland and West Pomeranian).

The key is the use of complementary solutions based on selected actions within the framework of ROPs and to contribute with own funds, which are, on the one hand, a participation in ROPs, and, on the other hand - investments complementary to ROPs’ tasks and targeted towards areas not covered by them.

In addition, in this financial perspective, the “Digital School” programme might be continued, enabling the financing of selected solution modules (main parts of infrastructure).

Cisco and its partners offer a wide range of financial mechanisms for selecting the optimal way to finance the implementation of our solutions. Depending on your needs, we offer deferred payment mechanisms, credits, and more.

Major suppliers of solutions

  • Ciscosecure communication and data processing
  • Samsung innovative electronic solutions
  • Seventicanon-verbal communication systems
  • Vulcanmanagement of educational institutions
  • Young Digital Planetapplications supporting the educational process
  • Schneider Electricintelligent energy management
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Case study

Opole – Education in Opole meets the latest trends by implementing services based on global Internet network. The aim of the “eSchool” project is to transfer the school reality into virtual space. This allows students to easily access a variety of study materials and resources posted by teachers. In turn, teachers can prepare their tasks, tests and materials in an interesting form, e.g. educational games, and share them with colleagues from the teaching staff. An important objective of the project is to shorten the distance between students, parents and teachers. For example, thanks to the interactive student record service, parents can check online for any comments concerning their children. The project covers 111 institutions located in the region of Opole.

Małopolska – “Malopolska Education Cloud (Malopolska Chmura edukacyjna) is a project designed to encourage young people to broaden their knowledge and to pursue higher education, as well as to reduce educational exclusion outside the big cities in the Małopolska region. In addition, the initiative enables collaboration of Malopolska’s leading universities with lower secondary schools, which will result in raising the level of education. Within the framework of the project, students can participate in academic lectures via videoconferencing solutions installed in schools, and mobile devices. Lectures have an interactive form, so that asking questions to lecturers is possible. Thanks to the recording function, students who have skipped such classes e.g. due to illness, may replay the presented content at any time. The initiative involves: AGH University of Science and Technology, Jagiellonian University, Cracow University of Technology, Cracow University of Economics, University of Agriculture in Cracow and Pedagogical University of Cracow. The pilot project involves 21 schools in Malopolska. In the future, “Malopolska Education Cloud” is planned to be implemented in subsequent institutions.

Wrocław – A modern school is able to use the latest technologies to improve the management of the institution. For this purpose, the Integrated Management System of Wrocław Education was created. Within this project, an educational portal for exchanging news and information was set up, presenting the schools’ offer and providing electronic services to students, parents and teachers. A significant advantage is the transfer of a traditional student records’ journal to a virtual environment. In addition, by using Wrocław Library System, students can reserve on-line books from school libraries, including those outside of the institution they attend. The project not only aims to raise the quality of education, but also bridge the disparities in achievements of students.


Dialogue with residents

The future of today's cities is increasingly driven by the needs and expectations of their citizens. The process of increasing their participation in determining the shape and directions of development of the place where they live and work, launched with the administrative reform more than 15 years ago, gains more and more momentum and significance every year - equally for residents, community organizations and local governments.

The dialogue between these groups becomes critical, from the point of view of small, everyday challenges and expectations, as well as in view of strategic planning of multi-annual activities. The ease and availability of instruments for contact with local government becomes one of the essential elements for the assessment of its work. Previously used mechanisms, such as public consultations, surveys and physical counters cease to respond to social needs, and information obtained thanks to them can be incomplete and outdated - limiting their use in the knowledge-based management.

A new generation of city dwellers makes use of communication mechanisms that are quite different from those used by a typical office – they are using to a greater extent electronic media and social networking, while the areas where they spend their time do not include administrative institutions.

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Needs and expectations

Today's image of the administration (including local government) for most Poles continues to be perceived from the perspective of a petitioner and is associated with communication difficulties. The whole process of “settling” things in an office - from identifying the relevant department and person, through an administrative process that is fragmented and full of procedures, up to the limited possibilities of progress control - the general feeling is that it is tedious, lengthy and inefficient.

On the other hand - it is impossible for a local government to effectively respond to the needs of local residents without disposing of information about where a given problem occurred and how severe it is; information that would be easily accessible, accurate and linked to additional knowledge.

Changing this picture requires of course organizational activities that improve the functioning of an office as an organization, but also creating new channels of communication between stakeholders. A comprehensive solution, enabling the city to improve the quality of contact with the residents should:

  • provide access to the widest possible portfolio of channels of communication - not just direct, “at-the-counter” representatives, but also a unified contact centre that makes use of the electronic media,
  • allow an increase in the presence of an administrative office in areas that until now have not been associated with the possibility of settling administrative matters; areas where residents typically spend their time - shopping malls, cultural centres, healthcare facilities, etc.
  • provide access to experts, allowing to carry out processes that inhabitants are interested in and for an ongoing monitoring of their progress,
  • include social groups for which the typical means of contact are impossible or difficult to use - people with hearing disabilities or foreigners.
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A virtual counter

Building more direct, easier-to-use communication mechanisms becomes an indispensable element of the development strategy of many cities. Cisco and its partners allow creating a comprehensive technology platform, enabling the implementation of services that meet this vision.

  • Centre for contact with residents - allows creating a multi-channel (voice, video, text) contact centre, accessible by different mechanisms – phone, terminal or software video client, mobile devices. Allows bringing down communication barriers, providing access from anywhere and giving the opportunity to address an employee with any problem. Built-in calls and files distribution, based on competences, allow directing customers to the appropriate available persons.
  • Remote expert - an innovative solution, enabling the emergence of an office in almost any space in the city. It allows settling the matter in a safe and confidential environment, having contact with a living person, but in an effective way - using videoconferencing systems and the possibility of working together on applications or other documents.
  • Support for people with hearing disabilities - this solution enables remote support of a professional sign language interpreter, available at any time, complying in a simple manner with the requirements of the Act on sign language and other means of communication.
 

Centre for Contact with Residents

Remote expert

Support for people with hearing difficulties

Broadening resident-administration communication channels

Increasing the presence of the City Hall in the urban space

Enabling access to experts

Including social groups that remain excluded communication-wise

Dalej

Investment financing

Supporting projects materializing the idea of smart cities is one of the clearly articulated priorities of the starting financial perspective of the EU. Among the adopted operational programmes, funding mechanisms for such projects are available under the Digital Poland Programme and some Regional Operational Programmes (ROPs).

The key is the use of complementary solutions based on selected actions within the framework of ROPs and to contribute with own funds, which are considered, on the one hand, as a participation in ROPs, and, on the other hand – as investments complementary to ROPs’ tasks and targeted towards areas not covered by them.

Cisco and its partners offer a wide range of financial mechanisms for selecting the optimal way to finance the implementation of our solutions. Depending on your needs, we offer deferred payment mechanisms, credits, and more.

Major suppliers of solutions

  • Cisco secure communication and data processing
  • Seventica non-verbal communication systems
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Case study

Poland (including Kraków, Częstochowa, Biała Podlaska and others) – City halls, aid institutions such as State Fund for the Rehabilitation of the Disabled (PFRON), Social Welfare Centres (MOPS), Municipal Family Help Centre (MOPR), civil registrars, employment agencies and ticket offices at train stations in several Polish cities were equipped with Non-verbal Communication System. This solution is to provide on-line services of a sign language interpreter, using videoconferencing technology. During the videoconference, three persons communicate at the same time - an employee of the institution, a person with hearing disability and a sign language interpreter. Thanks to this form of contact, persons with hearing impairments can move more freely in public space, travel and deal with administrative affairs. In Poland, there are over 200 establishments that use Non-verbal Communication System.

Nice – In order to meet the needs of the inhabitants of Nice, the authorities placed first virtual points of contact with an administration employee ('Spot Mairie') in one of the popular shopping centres. This solution allows meeting with a representative of the city and settling necessary matters in a virtual environment, without the need to visit the office. The conversation takes place via Cisco TelePresence system, and the commands are typed via a touch screen. In addition, “Spot Mairie” can print the needed forms, as well as scan and send a document that was prepared in advance. The aim of the project is to facilitate contact of residents with administration employees in frequently visited places, such as libraries and shopping centres. The authorities are planning to install subsequent “Spot Mairie” points.

Barcelona – Thanks to virtual points of contact with an administrative employee, Barcelona residents can quickly settle necessary administrative matters. In the initial phase of the project, one can obtain information, while at the next stages of the project it will be possible to obtain necessary licenses or filing complaints. Thanks to this new form of contact with the officials, the time required for settling a case is reduced, thus reducing queues at the city hall. The system of services for the public administration also allows for reduced costs for residents’ care. The initiative aims to enable contact with the city in a convenient location and reduce the gap between the citizens and the civil employees.


Case Study

Amsterdam

Amsterdam was the first city in Europe to have WiFi.

It is thus not surprising that the city is a pioneer when it comes to implementing “smart city” solutions and “the Internet of things”. Amsterdam has smart parking, street and warning lighting systems, as well as smart electricity grids. By analyzing information on the road traffic, the system dynamically responds to the current situation in the city. These solutions significantly increase the quality of life of residents and their level of safety and contribute to cost reduction.

Barcelona

Barcelona will soon be able to boast about one of the most modern urban transport systems in Europe.

The city authorities have introduced a test of smart bus stops equipped with touch screens, WiFi and LCD screens, which display information for residents and tourists. Information collected by the system will allow for reducing the waiting time and analysing the congestion in the transportation system. First smart busses, equipped with wireless network, have also appeared in the capital of Catalonia. Barcelona residents can also benefit from the smart parking and road lighting system. All these solutions reinforce Barcelona’s position on the tourist market and improve the quality of life of residents.

Nice

In order to meet the needs of the inhabitants of Nice, the authorities placed first virtual points of contact with an administration employee ('Spot Mairie') in one of the popular shopping centres.

This solution allows meeting with a representative of the city and settling necessary matters in a virtual environment, without the need to visit the office. The conversation takes place via Cisco TelePresence system, and the commands are typed via a touch screen. In addition, “Spot Mairie” can print the needed forms, as well as scan and send a document that was prepared in advance. The aim of the project is to facilitate contact of residents with administration employees in frequently visited places, such as libraries and shopping centres. The authorities are planning to install subsequent “Spot Mairie” points.

Non-verbal Communication System

Poland (including Kraków, Częstochowa, Biała Podlaska and others)

City halls, aid institutions such as State Fund for the Rehabilitation of the Disabled (PFRON), Social Welfare Centres (MOPS), Municipal Family Help Centre (MOPR), civil registrars, employment agencies and ticket offices at train stations in several Polish cities were equipped with Non-verbal Communication System. This solution is to provide on-line services of a sign language interpreter, using videoconferencing technology. During the videoconference, three persons communicate at the same time - an employee of the institution, a person with hearing disability and a sign language interpreter. Thanks to this form of contact, persons with hearing impairments can move more freely in public space, travel and deal with administrative affairs. In Poland, there are over 200 establishments that use Non-verbal Communication System.

Media about ”Polish City of the Future”

Dziennik Zachodni

Dziennik Zachodni

”Polish City of the Future”

”(…)Polish City of the Future is an innovative project geared towards development and increasing competitiveness among Polish cities by using new technologies. In order to take full advantage of the potential such technologies offer, cities have to implement them in a coordinated and comprehensive way, eventually transforming into smart cities.(...)”

wyborcza.pl

wyborcza.pl

”Smartcity in Poland?”

”(…)The Polish City of the Future platform will inspire the deployment of innovative traffic management solutions, intelligent city lights control, systems improving public safety or solutions for modern, multimedia education.(...)”

Computerworld

Computerworld

”Cities of the future integrate data”

”(…)The main goal of the Polish City of the Future platform is to transfer knowledge, prepare and promote comprehensive tech architectures for cities’ in their most crucial and cost-consuming areas of responsibility.(...)”

Forbes

Forbes

”Trends, technology, city 2015”

”(…)Not only does a city start to shape the way we live, but also the way we think about development and investments. One of such ideas is so called smart city, a project of an intelligent city in which all modern companies want to participate, also in Poland, where the Polish City of the Future initiative has been launched and is supported by the know-how of Cisco, Philips or IBM.(...)”

IT w administracji

IT w administracji

”Polish City of the Future”

”(…)The process of increasing participation in determining the shape and directions of development of the place where people live and work gains more and more momentum and significance every year - equally for residents, community organizations and local governments. (…) To provide a modern, multi-channel communication between residents and the local government, new IT solutions should be reached for. The Polish City of the Future project has been launched to do that.(...)”

money.pl

money.pl

”Are Polish cities smart?”

”(…)Cities in Poland are willingly investing in modern solutions that make their residents’ life easier, by utilizing information. The process of becoming smarter may even be easier since companies – seeing the growing interest of local governments – propose a comprehensive offer to them. (…) The Polish City of the Future project is a good example – this smart city concept is developed by Cisco, IBM, Swarco, Schneider Electric, Philips Lighting, Vulcan, Samsung, Seventica and Young Digital Planet.(...)”

wprost.pl

Wprost

”Polish schools will change? Latest technology is about to help”

”(…)Soon Polish schools will be able to use modern IT systems, such as educational cloud, more extensively. It will be possible thanks to the Polish City of the Future project which apart from education will be also focusing on security, transport, communication and contact with residents.(…)”

Forbes

Forbes

”Smart city: a place, where life is easier”

”(…)The most serious smart city project is Polish City of the Future - a coalition of technology companies operating in various fields, like Cisco, Philips Lighting and Samsung. The alliance has been established because company managers felt that by working together they can more effectively share the vision of how to build a smart city in Poland.(...)”

interia.pl

Interia

”Polish City of the Future– open platform of intelligent solutions for cities“

”(...)Polish City of the Future project has been launched in order to develop and expand competitiveness of Polish cities by using new technologies. Project will be carried out by an open ecosystem of partner companies: Cisco, IBM, Philips Lighting, Samsung, Schneider Electric, Seventica, Swarco, VULCAN and Young Digital Planet. (...)“

Radio PIN

Radio Pin

”BIZON – Responsible and Modern Business“

Interview with Piotr Skirski, Strategic Projects Director at Cisco, on Smart Cities and Polish City of the Future project

Polskie Radio Program 4

Program czwarty

”Fourth dimension”

Listen to what Piotr Skirski from Cisco says on the Polish City of the Future project

Harvard Business Review

Harvard Business Review

”Internet of Everything drives the economic growth”

”(...) Every week there are more and more examples worldwide of initiatives to build intelligent and effectively managed cities. The trend to build smart cities using Internet of Everything (IoE), has also come to Poland. A good example of it is the Polish City of the Future, an open platform of intelligent solutions for cities (...)”.

Świat Nauki

Świat Nauki

”Open platform of intelligent solutions for cities”

”(...) As research conducted by Cisco shows, by using the latest technologies, cities around the world can potentially gain up to 1.9 trillion dollars over the next 10 years. This is why more and more cities decide to work towards becoming Smart Cities. ( ... ). Building a smart city requires an integrated, systemic and open approach. Polish City of the Future project, an open platform of solutions for cities, is the answer to that need.(...)”

Spidersweb.pl

Spidersweb.pl

”Which cities are already smart, and which are not?“

”(...) Polish City of the Future (...) is an innovative and unique project for development and increased competitiveness of Polish cities, by using new technologies. (...) The initiative has been introduced by Cisco Poland and evolved into an ecosystem of partners - market leaders in their respective industries - offering complementary solutions and enabling the construction of complex architectures, covering a wide range of cooperating systems (...)”

antyweb.pl

antyweb.pl

”Polish City of the Future project launch“

”(...) Also in Poland, we have examples of implementations supporting the idea of smart city, such as video surveillance systems or public WiFi zones. Very often, however, these solutions are only partially, if at all, integrated with other elements of the infrastructure of the city. And building a smart city requires an integrated, systematic and open approach. This need is now addressed by the Polish City of the Future project, which is an open platform of solutions for cities (...)”

money.pl

money.pl

”Polish City of the Future project launch“

”(...) The project involves Cisco, IBM, Philips Lighting, Samsung, Schneider Electric, Seventica, Swarco, VULCAN and Young Digital Planet, as well as AGH University of Science and Technology, AGH Centre for Advanced Technology for Cities of the Future and the Association of Polish Cities. The project meets the needs of the modern world, shaped by technology development and demographic change (...)“

wnp.pl

wnp.pl

”Polish City of the Future project launch“

”(...) Polish City of the Future is an open platform of solutions for smart cities. It aims to help cities in job creation, effective management, attracting investors, college graduates and the most desirable employees. (...)“

portalsamorzadowy.pl

portalsamorzadowy.pl

”Cities of the future. They compete with each other like companies“

”(...) Polish City of the Future - an open platform of intelligent solutions for cities - is an innovative and unique project for development and increased competitiveness of Polish cities, by using new technologies. The project will be implemented by an open ecosystem of partner companies. (...)“

Ask a question Find out more

Fill in the contact form and plan an individual consultation regarding the financing and implementation of the project in your city. You can also send an e-mail to: contact@polishfuturecity.com